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Book Day is Every Day

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This year, I found UNESCO's message on World Book and Copyright Day particularly poignant. In March 2015 , the Hill Museum & Manuscript Library at St. John’s University in Queens, New York, announced that it was creating digital records of more than 22,000 rare and historically significant documents from a library in Mali, Timbuktu. The family library of Mamma Haidara has one of the largest manuscript collections in Timbuktu, and some of its documents date back to the 13th century. Two years earlier, Hill Museum & Manuscript Library said that it set up a two-camera studio in Mali's capital city of Bamako. In collaboration with a Mali-based nongovernmental organization, local workers were trained and began creating digital copies of manuscripts from Timbuktu's private libraries. The studio expanded recently, adding two more cameras. “Our team in Bamako has made remarkable progress. After a full year of work, the team digitized over 250,000 images from the Abubakr Ben

Florence Lasayo’s “The Child with No Identity” is an engaging look into the author’s life in Sierra Leone and beyond

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Florence Lasayo’s newly released “The Child with No Identity” is an engaging look into the author’s life in Sierra Leone and beyond.   “This is a story about a little girl who has no idea where she came from," Lasayo shares. "She just found herself in the arms of a beautiful old woman who treated her with so much love, compassion, and care.” Published by Christian Faith Publishing, Florence Lasayo’s new book will pull at the heartstrings and have readers rooting for the little girl who desperately seeks a place of safety and understanding. Lasayo shares a compelling story full of personal reflections and heartfelt faith. Consumers can purchase “The Child with No Identity” at traditional brick & mortar bookstores, or online at Amazon.com, Apple iTunes store, or Barnes and Noble. For additional information or inquiries about “The Child with No Identity,” contact Christian Faith Publishing . 

Poet Oumar Farouk Sesay pays tribute to the Importance Of Personal Responsibility in Sierra Leone

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Oumar Farouk Sesay is a leading Sierra Leonean poet. His first volume of poems, "Salute to the Remains of a Peasant" was published in 2007. His second collection of poems, "The Edge of a Cry" was published in 2015 by the Sierra Leonean Writers Series (SLWS). Farouk is a graduate of Fourah Bay College, University of Sierra Leone. BECAUSE WE ARE POOR (For those who use poverty  as an excuse for our failings as a people) So, because we are poor, we must quarry  the mountains, gouge the boulders, let them roll  downhill. So, when it rains, the entire mountain  will peel off and cascade down the slope to end  our life of misery. Because we are poor, therefore, we must fell the  hundred years old trees, deplete the biodiversity  and haul the trees to China for nickels and dime like a man selling his kidney to buy whisky. Because we are poor, we must cut down trees  at the Guma valley reserve to starve the dam of water, then we demolish reservoirs and obstruct the pipe net

World Book Day 2021

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In the run-up to World Book and Copyright Day, UNESCO launched the World Book Day bookfaceChallenge. Students, teachers, readers, as well as the book industry and library services have been invited to express their love for reading by participating in this challenge . UNESCO also shared materials to help engage all communities of readers, individuals, and institutions.  23 April is the date on which authors, William Shakespeare, Miguel de Cervantes, and Inca Garcilaso de la Vega all died. This date was a natural choice for UNESCO's General Conference, held in Paris in 1995, to pay a worldwide tribute to books and authors on this date, encouraging everyone to access books. How many books have you read on the " Amazon Best Sellers: Best Sellers in African Literature " list? 1. "Return to the Enchanted Island: A Novel," Johary Ravaloson 2. "Things Fall Apart," Chinua Achebe 3. "Americanah," Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie 4. "Half of a Yellow Sun

Susan's Bay, Freetown, Sierra Leone

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An undated aerial photo of Susan's Bay, Freetown by Wallin Eleazar Riebel of Otterbein University. The postcard was digitized in March 2006 and the digital publisher is the Otterbein University Library. The original photo is stored in the repository of the Otterbein University Library Archives. Postcard captioned, "Susan's Bay, Sierra Leone." Aerial view, looking inland. ( Susan's Bay, Freetown, Sierra Leone ) On Wednesday, March 24, Yvonne Aki-Sawyerr Mayor of Freetown wrote on Facebook :  "J ust left the scene of a terrible fire at Susan’s Bay. The entire community has been burnt to the ground. Thousands are affected. We won’t know the full scale of the disaster until tomorrow when we conduct an assessment with NDMA and other partners. Many children are missing, separated from their parents in the chaos. Twelve children were at the FSU at Eastern Police station. We understand that other children might have boarded boats moored on the wharf. Devastating to w

'Time is a sort of the Alligator River of passing events' | Fantasy History 20

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Time is a sort of river of passing events, and strong is its current; no sooner is a thing brought to sight than it is swept by and another takes its place, and this too will be swept away . – Marcus Aurelius F our miles up the estuary, there is a succession of charming bays and creeks, their shores covered with dense foliage from the water's edge up to the hills,  which rise at the back to a height of 1800 feet, and beyond them towers the Sugarloaf, attaining to upwards of 2500 feet above sea level. (Royal Geographical Society, March 14, 1892) A Revised Edition of the Ordinances of the Colony of Sierra Leone: Volume 1 Sierra Leone  ( 1st November 1908 ) The  old government wharf was constructed in 1867, and in  1896, the Protectorate of Sierra Leone was established by ordinance.  The Colony of Sierra Leone's  West Ward–first section–comprises the area within a line, which starts from the junction of Upper Brook Street and Westmoreland Street, and passes along Sanders Street to

Constance's World feat. the 1918 Influenza Pandemic

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This excerpt from a  book on Sierra Leonean women councilors, mayors, cabinet ministers, and political candidates was  first published on April 23, 2016. O ne of the pioneering political figures, Constance Horton Cummings-John, was born during the  1918 influenza pandemic, widely regarded as the most severe in recent history. It was caused by an H1N1 virus with genes of avian origin.   I magine nursing a six-month-old baby while a deadly virus rips through town. You have neighbors hovering between life and death and your husband’s assistant has lost 21 family members to the virus. The Spanish influenza of 1918 is regarded as the most severe pandemic in recent history. It was caused by an H1N1 virus with genes of avian origin.  First, victims experienced headaches, pain, and fever. Next, their faces turned blue-black. Then they coughed up blood and bled from the nose after. Finally, as bacteria invaded the lungs, vital organs transformed into fluid, drowning the patient. For